Charente • Deux-Sevres • Vienne • Haute Vienne • Limousin

Hello all

This is a first entry to this group. Hopefully you’ll be able to talk about places you’d like to go, dishes you especially liked. Anything food-based I guess.

My first club contribution

I don’t think there is an actual book, tv or film club yet. It doesn’t have to be a meetup and read kind of thing. Someone could suggest a book, tv or film, once read/seen we could add a comment to the post that made the original suggestion – that sort of thing.

Its easy to add a picture too, you could, say, go to Amazon, right click on the image and click copy. Then load it here with a right click and paste.

or use the browse button below

Product Details

Open post

My first member contribution

So this is me, the web site creator. This site is only as good as its contributors. I hope I have made the site as useful as possible and that time consuming tasks such as money collection have been reduced.

I love to be able to demystify computers for people. Many of whom are often baffled at the first mention of anything vaguely technical and turn off. Its worth persevering, if you know your browsers from your search engines, or your task bar from your tool bar then, chance are, you’re are getting much more out of your computer than someone who doesn’t (know…).



Website links where forms can be obtained to apply for CMU

Link to that describes CMU in English

Find your local Charente CPAM office address & opening times

Medicine Labels (Lignettes)

White labels means State will refund 65% of the cost
Blue label means State will refund 35% of the cost
Yellow means State will refund 15% of the cost

The rest of the cost will usually be met by your top-up assurance but – NOTE some top-up policies exclude yellow labels from their refund systems.

Classic Cars

If your car is a classic or vintage more than 30 years old, the above notes about registering in France still apply but you need to address the issue that it will not have a Certificate of Conformity.

The FFVE (Fédération Française des Véhicules d’Epoque) is authorised to issue certificates which the Prefecture will accept in place of the Certificate of Conformity. Download and complete their application form and send it to the address on their web site along with copies of all the documentation listed above under ‘Registering UK car in France’. They will also require two photographs of the car and one each of the engine number and chassis/body number, plus a cheque for €50.

You may find that some information they ask for is not available for your car. It’s UK registration document may even show blanks against similar listed items. If you can’t get the information off the internet or from a dealer or owner’s club, enter ‘non énuméré’ (not listed) on the form.

FFVE can also help with vintage and classic motorcycles and historic military vehicles.Their web site is:

Registering a UK car in France

A large number of UK citizens moving to France prefer to bring their car with them, while others already living here buy cars in the UK. Registering your UK vehicle in France is not as traumatic as some may have you believe – providing you have all the correct documentation. This is a simple guide:

  1. Fit right-dipping headlights – stick-on beam deflectors are not acceptable. Check the cost of doing this in both countries before you import the car. It may be cheaper in UK.
  2. Send DVLA the appropriate part of the UK Registration Document (V5C) to request a Certificate of Permanent Export. This may take a few weeks to arrive in France.
  3. If you don’t have one with the car already, you will need a ‘Certificate of Conformity’, in French. This will probably have to come from the manufacturer’s main office in France. You should be able to find details on the internet. They will make a charge, possibly around 140 Euros.
  4. Note that Certificates of Conformity were introduced in 1996, so if you have a pre ’97 car or a classic, it may not have one. The authorities in France will not accepot your application without one but is a way round this… See Pre-1997 / Classic cars below. Also note that it might already be on the log book I believe for cars newer than 2005.
  5. When you get the car here, insure it. There are many brokers around or you can ask your bank.
  6. Take the vehicle UK documentation (Registration Document and Certificate of Permanent Export) plus the bill of sale showing you as the purchaser in UK and the price paid, your passport and a utility bill to your local Centre des Impots (Tax Office). Ask for a ‘Quitus Fiscal’ (full title; ‘Cetificat D’Acquisition D’Un Vehicule Terrestre À Moteur’) which states that there is no TVA (Vat) due on it in France.
  7. If more than three years old, book it in for a CT (Control Technique or French ‘MOT’). You will need all the car documents to do this. You might consider having the headlight alignment re-checked first by your local garage – just in case. It will need a new CT every two years.
  8. Now you can apply for your Certificat d’immatriculation (was called Carte Grise). Go to THIS GOVERNMENT WEB SITE and download form Fiche signalétique du Formulaire n°13750*03. This is a pdf form that you fill in on-screen or by hand.
  9. Take all the above documents to your local Prefecture and join the queue. They will take your papers and if everything is in order, may give you a document showing your new French registration number. Otherwise, you new number will be on the Certificat d’immatriculation which will arrive by post in a week or two. They will also make a one-off charge which varies according to the size or type of car and its age (it is much less if the car is more than 10 years old), and can (according to some) vary from Prefecture to Prefecture.
  10. Buy your new number plates. It is illegal to attach them with screws or bolts – they must be pop-riveted. So it’s probably best to get them from a service centre which can fit them for you.
  11. Tell your insurance company that you now have French registration.

This all seems very long winded and it does cost money, so is it worth it? Well, the costs are one-off, there is no annual road tax in France and CTs (Mots) are every two years. If you work out the cost of taking the car back to UK every year just for an MOT and for the privilage of paying DVLC, then it almost certainly is worth it.

Quite apart from which, French law says if your home is in France, you have six months to register the car here. You may be comfortable driving a UK registered car for a while, but just think of the consequences for your insurance and under the law if you have an accident…..

Artisans (Tradesmen)

The CLE does not give recommendations for specific Artisans (Tradesmen) but if you would like details of those held on CLE files, please contact any committee member or email us from out contact page

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